Inside the Walls (ITW) Book Update issued (Oct 11, 2010)

October 12, 2010: Barry Cauchon

Hi all: This is just a quick note to everyone who signed up for our ITW Book Update. Yesterday, we issued the update by email from outreach@awesometalks.com with the PDF attachment. It was sent out to everyone who had signed up for our Update Mailing List. Some emails were rejected as they are outdated or no longer valid. If you did not receive this mailing or wish to be added to our mailing list, please send me a quick note at outreach@awesometalks.com with BOOK in the subject title and I’ll send the update to you as soon as possible.

Best

Barry

outreach@awesometalks.com

Inside the Walls Book Update Announcement

October 7:  Barry Cauchon.

By Monday, October 11, John Elliott and I will be emailing out a long awaited update on our book called Inside the Walls: The Final Days of the Lincoln Conspirators. Over the past year, many of my great followers from here, and from our Facebook page, have signed up for these updates. We have collected quite a large list and are now ready to share our progress with you. 

There is a lot of new stuff to report. Least of which is that John has created a new website (yet to be built) dedicated to Inside the Walls. We both have new email addresses which we will share with you in the update letter. My current blog email at outreach@awesometalks.com will still remain active however. 

It has been a few months since our last update so you haven’t missed anything recently. These detailed updates are only shared with those who have requested them by email. If you are not on our ITW Book Update List and wish to receive updates, please send an email at outreach@awesometalks.com with “BOOK” in the subject line. Leave your email address, and name if you like, and I’ll be sure to include you. This list is strictly used for our own purposes and will not be shared with others.

If you believe you are already on the list but don’t receive the update by October 11, please write me again so I can forward it to you.

John and I are both humbled and grateful for the tremendous interest shown in our book. As well, we cannot begin to thank the numerous members of the Lincoln Research Community who have shared parts of their own research and knowledge with us. Their encouragement and involvement with this project have been nothing short of amazing. They have given us the material needed to bring the content of our book to a level we never imagined a year ago. I can assure you that our dedication page will be a lengthy one.

We look forward to updating you.

Have a great day.

Best

Barry

outreach@awesometalks.com

Update on “THE ANGEL OF MARYE’S HEIGHTS” documentary

October 6, 2010: Barry Cauchon

Hi all: I’ve been negligent in keeping you up to date on what has been happening with Clint Ross and Michael Aubrecht and their documentary “The Angel of Marye’s Heights”. Clint just sent out an update so I wanted to pass it along. They are raising funds for producing the DVD of the film. To be a part of this exciting project, read the update below and then visit their website. Your support is very much appreciated. I’ve seen the film and it’s an excellent film.

Best

Barry

outreach@awesometalks.com

——————————————–

FROM CLINT ROSS: DIRECTOR

Hey Folks,

We are steadily approaching our first steps in producing Right Stripe Media’s first DVD, The Angel of Marye’s Heights.  We are striving to release the film by our determined goal of early 2011 just in time for the Civil War Sesquicentennial . Here are some recent quotes by experts about the film:

“I just watched your Kirkland movie and was super impressed. Very well written and accurate script, use of historians, the graphics were excellent. Overall a very professional looking production. Great job!” – Mac Wyckoff, retired NPS historian and THE leading authority on Richard Kirkland and the 2nd South Carolina Volunteers. 
 

“This film was a poignant, inspiring portrayal of an unassuming hero. It made a touching Civil War story leap from the pages of history and come alive.” – Jane Conner, historian and author of Birthstone of the White House and Capitol and Sinners, Saints, & Soldiers in Civil War Stafford. 

In our haste of anticipation and preparation, we just wanted to stop and say a quick “thank you” to all our supporters that have contributed to this film either through financial contributions or by simply being the man or woman on the street spreading the word. We could not and cannot do this without YOU

We are 1/3 of the way there.  We have just over $2,000 to raise in order to meet our goal of $3,000 by December.  Michael and I are raising support by traveling to various museums and universities to host screenings and talks/discussions about our film and the preservation of history.  However, the majority of our support has come through you guys… our fans!  So “thank you” again for all of your much needed contributions!    

On a side note, just yesterday Michael and I were on Victory-FM’s “Welcome Home” program.  We will be posting links to these interviews soon, but in the meantime, if you’d like to read about our latest screening at Mary Washington University where Michael was personally invited by the President to host a private screening, follow the link below to our blog. You can keep up with our screening dates (including upcoming shows at Stafford and Pittsburgh) on our website under EVENTS.

http://www.theangelmovie.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=14&Itemid=74

We’ll be talking to you soon, but in the meantime, keep spreading the word!


Clint Ross
Right Stripe Media, LLC
www.theangelmovie.com
http://www.pinstripepress.net/RSM.html
ceastwood73@gmail.com

Published in: on Wednesday, October 6, 2010 at '10:47 am'  Comments (2)  
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Boy at the Hanging Revisited…Your Opinion Welcomed

October 01, 2010: Barry Cauchon

A young boy (left) views the hanging bodies of Mary Surratt and Lewis Powell on July 7, 1865.

This week, I had a series of emails from Professor of History, Martha Sandweiss at Princeton University. She had read my article from March 07, 2009 called Who Was the Boy at the Hanging (Lincoln Conspirators Execution Photos). This features a story by researcher Steven G. Miller based on a 1914 Washington Star article sourced by Michael Kauffmann. The piece focused on trying to identify a boy found in one of the ten Alexander Gardner photographs of the Lincoln conspirator executions. In the photograph, the young boy stands fixated in front of the scaffold gazing upon the lifeless bodies of the four executed conspirators.

Professor Sandweiss complimented the story and says the Miller article is an excellent hypothesis. But she believes that the image of the boy, identified as John C. Collins, seems to show a boy much younger in age (8-10 years old) than Collins was on July 7, 1865. Collins was born on September 19, 1850 which would have made him 14 years old at the time of the executions. Professor Sandweiss believes that there is about a 4-6 year difference in age between the boy in the photo and Collins.

How old is this boy?

As part of Professor Sandweiss’ research into the story about this ‘boy’, she has questioned the reasons for this age difference. She concedes that Collins was probably at the hangings but challenges whether the image is actually of him? Could this be someone else? Are there records of other boys attending the executions?

To answer the last question, I can tell you that there was at least one other boy present. The person I’m referring to was Alfred C. Gibson, one of General Hartranft’s clerks. At the time of the executions, he was probably around 16 years old. In two different newspaper interviews given between October, 1927 and April, 1928 (over 62 years after the executions), Gibson claimed he witnessed the executions and stood about ten feet in front of the scaffold and George Atzerodt’s position. Gibson’s statements should be taken with a grain of salt as some of his ‘memories’ conflict with other first person eyewitness accounts. But if his recollections are true, and that he did indeed stand in front of the scaffold, then it is not far from the location where the ‘Boy at the Hanging’ is found.

As tempting as it is to suggest that Gibson could have been the ‘boy at the hanging’, I personally believe that this is not the case. The main reason is how the boy in the photo is dressed and equipped. Gibson had a room inside the penitentiary so he would not have needed to carry a gunny sack or other field equipment. John C. Collins or another field soldier, would more than likely have needed these items.

Does this help Professor Sandweiss to further her research? Perhaps not, other than to show that at least one other young boy was present at the hangings. Since that is the case, there is no reason to believe that others were not there as well. If this boy was not John C. Collins or Alfred C. Gibson, then I’m at a loss to know who it could be. To date, I have not come across any research that suggests any other boys there that day.

I am sure that some of you are going to point out that the professor’s assertion about this not being John C. Collins, is based solely on viewing just one photograph. It is subjective and based on opinion rather than scientific fact. Other viewers might be perfectly content believing that the boy in the photo is fourteen. These are all fair statements but please let me be clear about why I posted Professor Sandweiss’ challenge here. Especially for you junior researchers, this is an important lesson. Where research is concerned, I am a huge believer in the need to challenge the status quo. Do not take history at face value. Don’t believe one version of history is correct just because it seems plausible without checking and cross referencing as many other sources as you can. I can’t tell you how many times my mind has been changed about something because better evidence was uncovered to disprove my former belief.

When Professor Sandweiss challenged whether the boy was 8-10 versus 14 years old, it wasn’t to be subjective about it. The age conflict didn’t sit right with her and it compelled her to investigate the subject further. And now she is actively seeking the truth. That is one way how research starts. Curiosity. Enlightenment. Challenge. Seek out more information to find the truth. Research, research, research. Cross reference. Challenge your own results. Research, research, research. Always be open to other possibilities. Believe your theory if it is plausible. If doubts remain, challenge those theories again. Never stop looking for answers.

I encourage people to weigh in on this subject. Whether you wish to comment on the story of John C. Collins or discuss research methodology, I’d love to hear from you.

Have a great day.

Best

Barry

outreach@awesometalks.com