EXCITING NEW DISCOVERY: Who Gave the Signal to Spring the Traps?

March 19, 2011: Barry Cauchon

The executions of the four condemned Lincoln conspirators on July 7, 1865 were witnessed and told to the world through many sources. First person, eyewitness accounts taken from newspapers, private letters and people who participated in the event all shared vivid details of what occurred. In conjunction with these, photographers Alexander Gardner and his assistant Timothy O’Sullivan took ten graphic photographs of the proceedings from start to finish.

Over time, a conflict arose between what was reported in the first-person, eyewitness accounts and what was visually seen in the Gardner photographs. The eyewitness evidence did not match the visual evidence. For over a century, researchers, writers, filmmakers and documentarians have wrestled with this dilemma but have never successfully found an acceptable solution.

Through our research, John Elliott and I believe we have found the answer and are able to share it with you now. It is one of several discoveries we have made that will be found in our upcoming book Inside the Walls: The Final Days of the Lincoln Conspirators. We are very excited about solving this puzzle and although not earth-shattering, we humbly categorize it as a simple ‘historical adjustment’.

Who Gave the Signal to Spring the Traps? is the chapter from our book where we present the resolution to this long-standing conflict involving three simple questions: Who gave the signal to spring the traps, from what location was it given from and by what method was it delivered?

John and I held off sharing this information with you until we officially presented our findings at the Surratt Society & Surratt House Museum 2011 Conference, Lincoln Assassination: New Perspectives in Clinton, MD on March 19. This now being done, we hope you find the information interesting and look forward to hearing your feedback.

Who Gave the Signal to Spring the Traps

[Click on the link above to read the chapter].

If you wish to purchase the printed supplement of this discovery under the “A Peek Inside the Walls: The Final Days of the Lincoln Conspirators”, go to the following link.

https://awesometalks.wordpress.com/2014/04/14/for-sale-a-peek-inside-the-walls-supplements-1-2-3/.

No. 1: 2011 Supplement

No. 1: 2011 Supplement

Thank you.

Best

Barry

outreach@awesometalks.com

Advertisements

Upcoming Interviews on An Awesometalk With…

March 9, 2011: Barry Cauchon

I am starting my spring preparations for new interviews for this season. Randal Berry did a great job in my last one.

Next week, I’ll be meeting with Kate Clifford Larson in Boston as I head down to Washington for the Surratt Society conference. Kate is an historian, Ph.D. and writer who teaches at  both Simmons College and Wheelock College in Boston. She is the author of  two books: The Assassin’s Accomplice: Mary Surratt and the Plot to Kill Abraham Lincoln and Bound For the Promised Land: Harriet Tubman, Portrait of an American Hero.

I hope to do an interview with Kate sometime in late March/early April.

Beyond that, I’ll be speaking with numerous people at the Surratt Society Conference and am sure I will gather some great folks to interview while there. Stay tuned for a list of upcoming ‘interviewees’ after my return.

If you have a unique story to share, I’m always happy to hear from you as well.

OPPORTUNITY FOR STUDENTS AND TEACHERS

I am looking for students and teachers who would like to participate in An Awesometalk With. If you have an interesting story to tell or are involved in history (how do you teach it or do you know someone local who adds great value to your local history), I’d like to hear from you. As this blog is worldwide, I want to hear and share interesting history-based stories from around the world. You know your community better than anyone, so share it.

Suggested ideas: Teachers: Perhaps you have a unique way of teaching your students history or have a special class project that always works with your students. Perhaps you bring in guest speakers or take field trips. The idea here is to share your creative approaches with my readers (many of which are other teachers and students). Everyone has a story to tell. Let us hear yours.

Students: What interests you about history? What kind of class projects and teaching methods do you get the most enjoyment out of? How do you research? Do you have experts you can talk to?  What was the best project/historical subject you’ve ever studied? What is your favorite historical event or period to study? Tell me about a teacher or person that really inspires you and why.

Again, the key here is to share something different and unique with the followers of A Little Touch of History. If your story is chosen to be shared in An Awesometalk With, I will interview you in a recorded 5-10 minute segment and post it here for the world to see and hear.

Don’t be shy. Share your stories.

Please send your suggestions and stories to my email at outreach@awesometalks.com.

Best

Barry

outreach@awesometalks.com

.

THANK YOU TO ALL MY SUPPORTERS

March 07, 2011: Barry Cauchon

Hi folks: It’s less than two weeks before John Elliott and I present our work at the Surratt Society and Surratt House Museum 2011 Conference: Lincoln Assassination: New Perspectives. We have been told that this is the largest attendance they have ever had in the 12 years that the conference has been run. Congratulations to all the wonderful people who have had a hand at pulling this together.

I am really looking forward to meeting old friends there as well as making a whole bunch of new ones. More than a few attendees who have written me have mentioned that they are going there just to see me speak. I am honored by their comments, thankful for their support and very happy that I have something that people want to hear. I will say that I am also very humbled by their response. I feel that I just “do what I do” and hope everyone enjoys it. But thank you for the support. I will try hard not to disappoint.

I am a team player and love working with others. Other than this blog that I do maintain on my own, the book, my research activities and conference talk have all been a collaboration. I always learn from the experiences and love sharing the information with you. 

Researching and pulling a book together is no easy task. Preparing for a conference might seem easier but in fact can be just as difficult. The main reason for this posting is to acknowledge all of the people who have supported me during my time in the limelight…even if this limelight was created by myself…LOL. Everyone listed below (and forgive me for missing any of you) has directly or indirectly supported me with their friendship, kindness, encouragement and valuable information and assistance. It was about time that I really said thank you to each and every one of them.

THANK YOU ALL

  • Andy Jampoler (author)
  • Angela Smythe
  • Arlene Berry
  • Ben Rizzuto
  • Betty Ownsbey (author)
  • Bill Richter (author)
  • Blaine V. Houmes, MD (book contributor)
  • Cal Johnson (stuntman)
  • Charlene Henderson
  • Christine Jackson
  • Clint Ross (documentarian)
  • Colleen MacDougall
  • Cynthia Stormcaller (Andersonville Guild)
  • Dan Grossman (Dan@airships.net)
  • Daniel Weinberg (author)
  • Donna Stewart
  • Ed & Mary Beth Isaacs (two of my greatest supporters)
  • Ed Steers, Jr. (author)
  • Eileen Reilly
  • Frank Crawford
  • Frank J. Williams (retired Chief Justice of Rhode Island)
  • George Hauck
  • George Rivera
  • Gloria Swift (former curator of Ford’s Theatre)
  • Gregg Mastriforte
  • Harold Holzer (author)
  • Jim Cauchon
  • Jim Solomon (writer “The Conspirator”)
  • Joan Chaconas (Surratt Society)
  • John L. Howard, MS (pathologist)
  • Julia Cowdery (Surratt Society)
  • Karen Needles
  • Kathryn Coombs (in memoriam)
  • Kurt Graver (American Film Co.)
  • Laura F. Keyes
  • Laurie Verge (Surratt Society)
  • Melissa Jacobson (researcher)
  • Marty Cauchon
  • Michael Albrecht (historian/documentarian)
  • Michael Kauffman (author)
  • Mary Kauffman
  • Michael Todd Willoughby (Lord Willoughby)
  • Nikaela Zimmerman (Kansas State Historical Society)
  • Pamila Tift (in memoriam)
  • Pat Toms (President – Shannon Ulster Titanic Society, Ireland)
  • Randal Berry (www.Lincoln-Assassination.com) Lincoln-Assassination website
  • Richard Sloan (historian & researcher)
  • Rick Smith
  • Robert Krauss (historian/author)
  • Robert Redford (Director – “The Conspirator” – thanks for letting me visit your set)
  • Roger Norton (http://rogerjnorton.com/) Abraham Lincoln Research Site
  • Ronald Rietveld (historian)
  • Sandra Walia (Surratt Society)
  • Sebastiao Albano (Brazil)
  • Steven G. Miller (researcher / historian / author)
  • Susan K. Lemke (National Defense University)
  • Susan Proctor (Surratt Society)
  • Terry L. Alford, PhD (historian/author)
  • Tim Miller (President – Big Chief Entertainment)
  • Tom Schwartz, PhD (Illinois State Historian)
  • Web and Rob Stone (Producers – “The Conspirator”, American Film Co.)
  • All the great folks at the Library of Congress, National Archives, University of Chicago The Joseph Regenstein Library Special Collections, National Defense University Library, Ford’s Theatre, Andersonville Guild Drummer Boy Civil War Museum and the Surratt Society and Surratt House Museum.

Special thanks go out to my writing partner and friend, John E. Elliott, without whose help and support, none of this would have been possible.

And finally, to all the students, followers and readers of my blog who have added so much to make it shine. I can never thank you enough.

Best

Barry

outreach@awesometalks.com